Thursday, April 13, 2017

Third-Party Management as a Weapon against Indigenous Protest

The most recent episode of the weekly indigenous current affairs podcast Media Indigena introduces the problems with the "Kafkaesque" government tactic of imposing third-party management on indigenous communities.

Host Rick Harp introduces the discussion by referring to an article in Ricochet last Friday on the Algonquins of Barriere Lake being kept in the dark about their own finances. Pam Palmater and Paul Seesequasis then describe how the third-party system is used as a political tool to undercut indigenous sovereignty, with the example of the Algonquins of Barriere Lake referred to throughout as a paradigmatic example.

You can listen to the entire episode here, and can get to the start of the third-party discussion by skipping to the 16 minutes and 44 second mark.

Monday, April 10, 2017

Algonquins of Barriere Lake Request National Chief Bellegarde to Press for Urgent End to Federal Third Party Management in Their Community


Press Release

(Kitiganik, Algonquin Territory/April 10, 2017) The Chief of the Algonquins of Barriere Lake announced today that a letter was sent to AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde requesting that the National Chief support their call for an immediate end to Third Party Management (TPM) and an immediate return control of the community’s financial and program administration back to the Chief and Council. The Barriere Lake Chief also wants to the National Chief to communicate his support for the Barriere Lake position to the INAC Minister and the Standing Committee on Indigenous Affairs.

Chief Casey Ratt said “The federal government’s TPM has controlled all aspects of our community's program and services since 2006. There is no accountability to our people. Canada has made our system of governance almost irrelevant since many decisions are made by the TPM without any consultation with us taken together. These events have increased our hardship and poverty. We had to ask ourselves why the Government of Canada would take control away from our people, impose a TPM which actually made our lives worse. There is no exit strategy. Canada and TPM did nothing to work with us to build a bridge out of this situation. They seemed happy to let us go on forever.”

Tony Wawatie, Interim Director-General added “We always hear that First Nations must be accountable and transparent. Then how come Canada and TPM get away without being accountable and transparent to our people? Our TPM gets paid $550,000 a year to administer our poverty. Nothing in the TPM contract measures our quality of life or if the delivery of services actually improves under TPM. There is nothing to link TPM to positive outcomes for our community. It has nothing to do with improving our living conditions or the lives of our people. It has everything to do with the federal government keeping us in a state of dependency and arrested development. We have no role in developing TPM terms of reference. Each year the contract only requires the TPM to administer the current year's program and services. So, past debts are left unattended our deficit has grown not diminished under TPM.”

Chief Casey Ratt wrote today to the AFN National Chief, to specifically request: 
As there is no good reason to keep us in Third Party Management and we have the capacity to resume control of our financial and program administration we are calling on you to communicate your support for our position on the immediate end of Third Party Management in our community and the return of administrative control to our Chief and Council to INAC Minister Bennett and the Members of the Standing Committee on Indigenous Affairs during your appearance on April 11, 2017.

We are also calling on you to press Minister Bennett into an urgent face-to-face meeting with a delegation from our First Nation. We are prepared to come to Ottawa if necessary.

We also ask that you suggest to the Standing Committee that they recommend to the Auditor-General to conduct a study of the federal Default Prevention & Management Policy and use our First Nation’s situation as a case study. 
 In December 2015, the AFN Chiefs-in-Assembly directed the AFN National Chief and AFN Executive Committee to:
support the Algonquins of Barriere Lake in calling on the Government of Canada to participate in a reconciliation process with Barriere Lake Chief and Council, beginning with a return of administrative control over programs and services to the Barriere Lake Chief and Council.
Chief Casey Ratt concluded by stating “it is now time for the AFN National Chief to show his support for our First Nation by acting on our reasonable requests to press Minister Bennett to direct her officials to immediately end Third Party Management. Our people will not wait until for the INAC-AFN Fiscal Relations process concludes sometime next year.”

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 For More Information Contact: 
 Chief Casey Ratt     Cell: (819) 441-8002
Tony Wawatie, Interim Director-General  Cell: (819) 355-3662
Michel Thusky (French) Spokesperson   Telephone: (819) 215-0591

Friday, March 24, 2017

Human Rights Delegates to Barriere Lake Support Community Demands for Immediate End to Third Party Management





March 23 2017

Human Rights Delegates to Barriere Lake Support Community Demands for Immediate End to Third Party Management

Photos by Allan Lissner/Barriere Lake Solidarity.
                        
(Ottawa) We are a group of civil society organizations, concerned citizens, and politicians who visited the Algonquins of Barriere Lake on their Rapid Lake Reserve on Wednesday.

We sat aghast after presentations on the impact of “third party management” on the community. We learned that Indigenous Affairs hired external accounts to manage the band’s finances in 2006 while being paid hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. Despite paying astronomical fees, Barriere Lake’s deficit of a measly $83,000 has not been paid off to this day.

In the midst of plenty for Third Party Manager Lemieux-Nolet a community member is living in the basement of a burned out home with his family because not a single new house has been built in the community in 11 years.

We heard stories of money running dry for basic programs for the community. Stories about youth attending colleges in Sudbury and Ottawa texting band councilor Norman Matchewan about going hungry day after day and being unable to pay their fees. Stories about medical transport being offered only once a day to and from the communities, forcing sick elders to go to the hospital at 6am and return at 9pm, despite having only a check-up mid-day.

The stories of third party management were only matched in their kafka-esque nature by stories of how the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs imposed a “Section 74” order on the community in 2010, abolishing recognition of the community’s customary government.

Since then, Barriere Lake has been fighting to restore recognition for their customary government – a land-based, direct democracy of the people – that was arbitrarily and coercively replaced with band council elections. “Section 74” is an archaic section of the Indian Act that is only rarely exercised.

“We just want control back over our lives,” Chief Casey Ratt said, addressing the group.

We believe that the community is suffering from the collateral damage of a federal and provincial system that seeks to terminate the unceded jurisdiction of the Algonquions of Barriere Lake in order to remove impediments to access their rich lands for resource extraction and development. As the survival of Barriere Lake community members is put


at stake daily by bureaucratic violence, Barriere Lake’s ability to sustain connection to their land is under attack by Toronto-based Copper One. We stand with Barriere Lake as they say no to mining on their territories.

Some delegates on our trip come from places around the world that are escaping civil war, but civil war is exactly what the treatment of Barriere Lake looked like to them.

Signed,

Zoe Todd, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, Carleton University
Hayden King, Assistant Professor, Public Policy and Administration, Carleton University

Representatives from the following organizations endorsed this letter:

NYC Stands with Standing Rock
Mining Injustice Solidarity Network
Immigrant Workers Centre
Right Relations Network
Council of Canadians
Ottawa Riverkeepers
International League of Peoples Struggles
Climate Justice Montreal
Ecojustice
Justice for Adbirahman
Quebec Solidaire
No One Is Illegal
Mexicans United for Regularization
Barriere Lake Solidarity
Barriere Lake Defense













Quebec Solidaire Statement of Support:


Media Coverage:



 Jorge Barrera asks the Minister of Indigenous Affairs about Barriere
Lake's TPM situation at 22 minutes:


Visit to Barriere Lake First Nation, March 22, 2017. Hayden King, compiled by Deborah Huron

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Press Release: Algonquins of Barriere Lake Call to End Third Party Management: Paying Government-Imposed Accountants 40 Time Initial Deficit


Algonquins of Barriere Lake Call to End Third Party Management: Paying Government-Imposed Accountants 40 Time Initial Deficit

(Ottawa, Algonquin Territory/March 23, 2017) Today, representatives of the Algonquins of Barriere denounced the federal government for imposing financial management on their band by accountants who earned millions of dollars over the last 10 years paid out of meager band funds.

NDP, M.P. Charlie Angus obtained documents that show that Barriere Lake pays much more than other bands under a federal policy of imposed “third party management” of the bands financial management for essential programs and services.

In 2006, the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs imposed third party management (TPM) to the Algonquins of Barriere Lake due to a $83,000 deficit, which has since been paid many times over in government-imposed accountant fees.

While the Third Party Manager Lemieux-Nolet is paid hundreds of thousands of dollars from band funds, a community member is living in the basement of a burned out home with his family because not a single new house has been built in the community in 11 years.

Because 10% of the bands funds are diverted into Third Party Management fees money runs dry for basic programs for the community annually. Youth attending colleges in Sudbury and Ottawa are texting band Councillor Norman Matchewan about going hungry day after day and being unable to pay their fees. Medical transportation services are being offered only once a day to and from the isolated community, forcing sick Elders to go to the hospital at 6 AM and return at 9 PM, despite having only a check-up mid-day.

On top of being forced into Third Party Management over 10 years ago with no exit plan, six years ago the federal Minister of Indian Affairs violated the internal autonomy and leadership customs of the band by imposing a “Section 74” order on the community.

Since then, Barriere Lake has been fighting to restore recognition for their customary government – an egalitarian, direct democracy of the people that existed for hundreds of years – that was arbitrarily and coercively replaced with a band council elective system. “Section 74” is a section of the Indian Act that has been rarely used since it was coercively exercised in 1924 over the Six Nations of the Grand River.

“We just want control back over our lives, the Third Party Manager continues to mismanage the programs meant for the benefit of our People by making financial transactions without our involvement or consent, or knowing anything about how our community is organized through our customs,” Chief Casey Ratt said.

Tony Wawatie, Barriere Lake’s Interim Director-General added “The Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs is doing a study on Third Party Management, which will likely be sent to the INAC-AFN Fiscal Relations consultation process and that will take another year. After 10 years our community services are in a mess and People want Third Party Management ended now as the new fiscal year is starting in a week.”

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For More Information Contact:

Chief Casey Ratt                                                     Cell: (819) 441-8002
Tony Wawatie, Interim Director-General             Cell: (819) 355-3662
Michel Thusky (French) Spokesperson             Telephone: (819) 215-0591

ALGONQUINS CALL TO END THIRD PARTY MANAGEMENT


MEDIA ADVISORY

FEDERAL BUDGET: ALGONQUINS CALL TO END THIRD PARTY MANAGEMENT
PAYING GOVERNMENT-IMPOSED ACCOUNTANTS 40 TIMES INITIAL DEFICIT

Ottawa, 22 March 2017. Barriere Lake First Nation will be holding a press conference today, March 23rd, 1h00pm, on Parliament Hill, Ottawa, to denounce the federal government for imposing financial management on their band by accountants who earned millions of dollars over the last 10 years paid out of meager band funds. Representatives from the Algonquin Nation will be joined by NDP Leadership Candidate Charlie Angus and human rights delegates from civil society groups who visited the community yesterday to show support for Barriere Lake’s struggle to restore financial control to their community.

When: March 23, 2017: 1h00pm
Where: Charles Lynch Room, Centre Block, Parliament Hill, Ottawa
What: Algonquins of Barriere Lake Calling To End Third Party Management
Who: Barriere Lake Algonquins and NDP leadership candidate Charlie Angus

MP Charlie Angus obtained documents that show that Barriere Lake pays much more than other bands under “third party management.” In 2006, the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs imposed third party management (TPM) to the Algonquins of Barriere Lake due to a $83,000 deficit, which has since been paid many times over in government-imposed accountant fees.

For more information:
- Chief Casey Ratt: Algonquins of Barriere Lake, 819-441-8002
- Tony Wawatie, Interim Director General, Algonquins of Barriere Lake, 819-355-3662
- Norman Matchewan, Band Councillor, Algonquins of Barriere Lake, 819-441-8006
- Michel Thusky, community member (French speaking), 819-215-0591
- Charlie Angus, MP and NDP leadership candidate, 613-992-2919

Friday, March 3, 2017

Upcoming events in Ottawa and Montreal, March 11th and 12th

Ottawa event :

The Algonquins of Barriere Lake are Asking for Your Help and Solidarity.

Circle the evening of Saturday March 11 to meet, share a chili meal, and find out more about the Algonquins’ struggle to resist mining exploration and build a sustainable way of life.
Saturday March 11
5:00 PM at First United Church
347 Richmond Road in Westboro.

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1650484101923739/
Poster: https://organizingforjustice.ca/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/ABL-March11-Ottawa-poster.jpg

The Algonquins of Barriere Lake (ABL) are our regional neighbours living in the Ottawa and Gatineau River watershed in Quebec.  They have never ceded their land nor do they wish to leave their traditional, land-based way of living.  Already, resource grabbing has caused them serious loss of forests.

Now, Copper One, a company financed and directed by the Forbes Manhatten Group, has staked claims on some of ABL’s lands (the Riviere Dore mining prospect) for copper mining.  The company is pressing for permission from the Quebec government to clear access roads and do exploratory drilling.  The drilling is polluting and if enough copper and other minerals are found for a mine, there would be devastating disruption of the land and water in a large area.

The Barriere Lake Defense team is hosting an evening of a chili supper, entertainment and, most important, a “teach in” about the history and current situation at ABL.  We are asking leaders from the ABL community, legal advisors, representatives from Mining Watch and other informed supporters to tell the story and explain the urgency.  We invite you to come and listen, discuss and ask questions of the community.

We hope to fill the hall with encouragement from you as well as help with the legal fees through a suggested donation of $20 (or more) for the evening.

Please come on Saturday, March 11 at 5:00, at First United Church, 347 Richmond Rd. in Westboro.

For more information, contact Joyce Hardman at jhardman@rogers.com or Joan Kuyek at joankuyek@sympatico.ca

To donate online now in support of Barriere Lake's efforts, please use paypal:
https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=JU3W8CQVB5Y2A

For the latest updates, please visit the website:
http://www.barrierelakesolidarity.org

Sign up for the email announcement list, and 'like' the Facebook page, via the website

Montreal event :

Brunch and Blockades : A screening over brunch of two short movies about the Algonquins of Barriere Lake

For months, the Algonquins of Barriere Lake have been maintaining a land protection camp on their territory, located a few hours North-West of Montreal.  In September 2016, the community learned that junior mining company Copper One planned to begin exploratory drilling in the heart of their territory, without consultation or consent. They responded by setting-up an indefinite land-defence camp. In recent weeks, the company's claim has been suspended due to "public safety concerns," however, Copper One is bringing the government to court to contest the suspension and to continue their mining project.  The Algonquins of Barriere Lake have insisted that no mining projects will happen on their territory, especially Copper One's proposed project because it will have a direct impact on the community's culture and drinking water.

To learn about the community and their history of struggle, come see the 1989 documentary Blockade : Algonquins Defend the Forest (27 minutes), and the 2014 documentary Honour Your Word (one hour).

When? : Sunday, March 12th, 2pm
Where?
: L'Auditoire, 5214 Saint Laurent Blvd
Admission? : Free.

Childcare will be offered on site.  The space in accessible to wheelchairs and the toilets are gender-neutral.  The films are in English with French subtitles and whispered translation to Spanish will be available.

This even is part of Israeli Apartheid Week. We encourage you to check out the week's programming.

About the films :

Honour Your Word is an intimate portrait of life behind the barricades for the Algonquins of Barriere Lake, an inspiring First Nation whose dignity and courage contrast sharply with the political injustice they face. (2014, 60 minutes)

Blockade follows the Barriere Lake Algonquins as they take on the government and the logging industry in a struggle to save their hunting grounds and way of life. (1989, 27 minutes)

Thursday, February 16, 2017

While Mining Company Launches Lawsuit Against Quebec, More Than 2000 Citizens Show Support for Barriere Lake Algonquin Nation


16 February 2017.
(Ottawa) More than 2000 people have signed a petition in support of Barriere Lake Algonquin First Nation. The petition was officially filed this morning in the Quebec National Assembly by Manon Masse, MNA. It calls on the Government of Quebec to suspend all mining activities on the Nation’s ancestral territory and to implement their co-management agreement for all resources on the territory.
“We would like to extend our gratitude to MNA Manon Massé and all others that support our efforts. As we move forward, we would like to see everyone working together towards reconciliation with First Nations rights and interests, including the right to self-determination and implementing our own vision for developing and caring for the land. It’s the only way to ensure a viable future for our community and our culture,” states Chief Casey Ratt, Algonquins of Barriere Lake.
For years, the Barriere Lake Algonquin Nation have tried to reach an agreement for the joint management of renewable resources on their territory with Quebec, and the Algonquins have always understood this to include the right to say “no” to mining. Their territory is located partly in the large La Vérendrye wildlife reserve, at the headwaters of the Ottawa River and at the junction of the regions of Outaouais, Abitibi-Témiscamingue, and Hautes-Laurentides.
On January 26, 2017, the Government of Quebec announced that it intended to suspend the mining claims of Copper One; this was confirmed on 8 February 2017. Although this was a step in the right direction, more than 90% of the ancestral territory of the First Nation remains open to mining – an unacceptable situation for the First Nation.
On February 1, 2017, the Assembly of First Nations of Quebec and Labrador adopted an unanimous resolution condemning the Mining Act of Quebec as being "unconstitutional" in regard to indigenous rights. The First Nations urge Quebec to change the Act.
On February 6, 2017, mining company Copper One started legal proceedings for a writ of mandemus against Quebec. The first hearing for this case will begin on Friday, 24 February in Quebec City. 
For information: 
Michel Thusky (French), Algonquins of Barriere Lake First Nation, 819-215-0591
Chief Casey Ratt (English), Algonquins of Barriere Lake First Nation, 819-441-8002
Ugo Lapointe, MiningWatch Canada, 514-708-0134

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Algonquin Nations Denounce Quebec’s Mining Act

(January 26, 2017. Val d'Or, Québec) Meeting this morning at a press conference at Val d'Or, the Algonquin Nations are uniting their voices to denounce the Quebec Mining Act and the impacts that it causes on their territorial and Aboriginal rights. The Algonquins are asking the Government of Quebec to review the foundations of the law, which they believe are unconstitutional.

"We face, even today, mining claims and mining projects for which we were never informed, consulted and never gave our consent," said Chief Casey Ratt of the Algonquins of Barriere Lake First Nation, who called the press conference.

"We support viable development of our territory, but we want to be able to make choices that respect our rights and meet our needs, our expectations, and our values. The current Mining Act is preventing us from doing that," added the Chief Lance Haymond of Kebaowek First Nation (Eagle Village).

According to Chief Harry St-Denis of Wolf Lake First Nation, "The Quebec government is responsible for ensuring that its laws and mining policies respect constitutional rights of Aboriginal Nations. Quebec’s Mining Act still fails this test in 2017."

The Algonquin First Nations are particularly critical of the Mining Act’s lack of any obligation to inform or to consult indigenous nations before the Government grants mineral claims on their traditional territories. The law also fails to require permits or consultation for the vast majority of mining exploration work, including drilling, mechanical trenching, and other use of heavy equipment. The Mining Act does not allow integrated land use planning in respect of indigenous peoples’ rights and aspirations, including the possibility of saying 'no' to mining claims located in culturally or ecologically sensitive areas.

In two presentations delivered this morning at Val d'Or, professors Jean-Paul Lacasse and Sophie Thériault of the Faculty of Law of University of Ottawa have been clear: the current Mines Act would not pass a constitutional legal test, if it were to be challenged by an Aborigoinal nations in Quebec. The solution would require a change in the law and in the meantime, the suspension and/or the takeover of mining titles in sensitive areas, or until agreements are reached with affected Aboriginal nations.

Mr. Clifford Lincoln, former Quebec’s Environment Minister and special representative for the Algonquin Nation of Barriere Lake, makes a similar point, considering that it would be more responsible for the Government of Quebec to take a path of reconciliation and agreements with Aboriginal Nations, rather than a path of continuous denial (see Mr. Lincoln’s video – English version available soon).

While the government announced its “intention” to “temporarily” suspend the claims of Copper One on the territory of the Algonquins of Barriere Lake on January 26th, the long term scenario remains uncertain. The Algonquin Nation, located largely within the La Vérendrye Wildlife Reserve, asks for public support in order to protect their culture, the land, the waters and the wildlife, which are all interconnected.

The Algonquin of Barriere Lake Nation held a day of information and awareness yesterday, January 25, with the participation of around 25 individuals and civil society organizations including: Greenpeace Quebec, Amnesty International Canada, Ligue des droits et libertés du Québec, Coalition Québec Meilleure Mine, MiningWatch Canada, Action Boréal de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Regroupement vigilance sur les mines en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, and the Conseil régional de l’environnement de l’Abitibi-Témiscamingue.

Sign the petition before February 10, 2017: https://www.assnat.qc.ca/en/exprimez-votre-opinion/petition/Petition-6379/index.html

Support the Algonquins of Barriere Lake: http://www.barrierelakesolidarity.org/p/t.html


Support statement from the Assembly of First Nations of Quebec & Labrador: http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/the-afnql-supports-the-algonquin-nation-communities-who-denounce-the-quebec-mining-act-611903515.html
 
Support statement from opposition party Quebec Solidaire: http://www.fil-information.gouv.qc.ca/Pages/Article.aspx?idArticle=2501267899

Quebec Government’s reaction the same day, announcing their ‘intention’ to suspend Copper One’s mining claims: http://www.fil-information.gouv.qc.ca/Pages/Article.aspx?aiguillage=ajd&type=1&idArticle=2501261419

Copper One’s reaction the next day, announcing their ‘intention’ to seek legal remedies if they are prevented from accessing their mining claims (likely against the Quebec government, and possibly against the Algonquins of Barriere Lake…): http://copperone.com/news/news-display/index.php?&content_id=147
For more information:
  • Chef Casey Ratt (English), Algonquin Nation of Barrière Lake, 819-441-8002
  • Chef Lance Haymond (English), Algonquin Nation of Kebaowek (Eagle Village), 819-627-6884
  • Chef Harry St-Denis (English), Algonquin Nation of Wolf Lake, cell. 819-627-3628
  • Clifford Lincoln (Français/English), former Quebec cabinet ministre and special representative of the Algonquin Nation of Barrière Lake, 514-441-9446
  • Tony Wawatie (Français/English), Algonquin Nation of Barrière Lake, 819-355-3662
  • Michel Thusky (Français), Algonquin Nation of Barrière Lake, 819-215-0591
Intervenants externes:
  • Jean-Paul Lacasse, Law Faculty, University of Ottawa, 819-210-1435
  • Sophie Thériault, Law Faculty, University of Ottawa, Sophie.Theriault@uottawa.ca
  • Ugo Lapointe, MiningWatch Canada & Coalition Québec meilleure mine, 514-708-0134
Website www.solidaritelacbarriere.blogspot.com

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/BarriereLakeSolidarity

French media:

Monday, January 30, 2017

The current situation

Mining

 In June 2016, while the community was negotiating an agreement with Quebec to implement 1991 and 1998 agreements, the Quebec government stealthily lifted the moratorium on mining on their ancestral and current-use territory, which had been in force since 2011.

The moratorium on mining activities was lifted unilaterally by the Quebec Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources without any prior advice to, or consultation with the community, as clearly expected according to the Supreme Court of Canada.

Mining activities are completely incompatible with both the terms and intent of the Trilateral Agreement of 1991, the Bilateral Agreement with Quebec of 1998, and the 2006 Joint Recommendations from Special Representatives of Quebec and Barriere Lake, which is to ensure the continuation of the community's culture and the sustainable use of renewable resources.

While the government announced its “intention” to “temporarily” suspend the claims of Copper One on the territory of the Algonquins of Barriere Lake on January 26th, 2017, the long term scenario remains uncertain. The Algonquin Nation, located largely within the La Vérendrye Wildlife Reserve, asks for public support in order to protect their culture, the land, the waters and the wildlife, which are all interconnected.  

Third Party Management

In 2006, the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs imposed third party management (TPM) to the Algonquins of Barriere Lake due to a $83,000 deficit, which has since been paid many times over in government-imposed accountant fees.

While the Third Party Manager Lemieux-Nolet is paid hundreds of thousands of dollars from band funds, a community member is living in the basement of a burned out home with his family because not a single new house has been built in the community in 11 years.

Friday, January 13, 2017

Community Dinner and Presentation in Montreal

Thursday January 19, 2017
6pm at the Centre Lorne
2390 Ryde
(Metro Charlevoix)

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/650646381804261/

Come eat with us, and hear community members talk about their land defense camp and other efforts. In the coming weeks, a junior mining company intends to begin exploratory drilling in the heart of the community’s territory, without consultation or consent. A copper mine would be devastating to the community, and would also affect a large part of the La Vérendrye wildlife reserve and the headwaters of the Ottawa river. Community members have set-up an indefinite land-defense camp on the main access road to the area.

The dinner is free / by donation. Those attending will be encouraged to donate to support the land defense camp if they are able to. The event is organized by QPIRG McGill,

Accessibility Info:
- The venue is wheelchair accessible
- Childcare will be provided on-site
- Whisper translation (En-Fr) will be available- We encourage people attending to not wear strongly scented products (perfume, cologne, hair products, lotions etc.) to the show. For more information on scent-free policies, see: https://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/hsprograms/scent_free.html